From the President: How We're Approaching Summer 2021 Planning
Update Nov. 10, 2020

As promised in my email and video message to you last month, I am reporting now on the meeting outcomes, the status of planning for our 2021 Summer Assembly, and to invite your input. I want to thank you for your patience this fall as our staff has focused on keeping our grounds-based community safe while also planning for our forthcoming 148th gathering as a Chautauqua community. 

Full presentation transcript »  | PDF of the presentation slides » Take community survey »


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Week One :: June 26–July 3, 2021

China and the World: Collaboration, Competition, Confrontation?

  • Under President Xi Jinping’s rule, the world’s most populous country has been working toward fulfilling the “China Dream” of global leadership, positioning itself inside a “superpower marathon” with the United States. Now, amid a trade war, the arrival of COVID-19 has been met with harsh rhetoric from both sides, further straining U.S.-China relations.
  • In this week of geopolitics, economics and cultural exploration, we consider China’s role in the world after COVID-19 and whether it emerges stronger or weaker politically and economically. How is it leveraging the pandemic in its recovery and in its efforts to overtake the U.S. as the global leader in technology, and how is the U.S. responding? Is China an unstoppable force or has it already peaked?

Week Two :: July 3–10, 2021

New Frontiers: Exploring Today’s Unknowns

  • There is so much left to explore and discover — and the more humans explore, the more we learn how much remains undiscovered. We consider these new frontiers in science, health, technology, the environment, and look to where new insights are being gained every day.
  • In this week, we welcome the new explorers, the next generation of innovators, to learn what work they’re doing on the cutting edge of these fields, exploring the extraordinary and making the unknown, known.

Week Three :: July 10–17, 2021

Trust, Society and Democracy

  • Recent work from the Pew Research Center indicates a troubling trend: a growing distrust in the public’s political wisdom when it comes to democratic decisions. This idea — that we no longer even trust each other — is a relatively new phenomenon, and reflects a larger picture of distrust in institutions across the board.
  • How can trust be restored, and what is the role of healthy skepticism? What do we do with institutions that society has declared broken, what must institutions do to rebuild trust with those they serve, and how can we work to regain trust with one another?

Week Four :: July 17–24, 2021

Many Americas: Navigating Our Divides

  • We are many Americas. We are many geographies, many economies, many cultures, many beliefs. We are a nation of differences and divides, and in a summer following a presidential election and a devastating pandemic that has thrown those divides into stark relief, we look to better understand those many Americas, the barriers—real or perceived—that keep us apart, and together consider how we navigate our differences in charting a future for our nation.

Week Five :: July 24–31, 2021

The Authentic Comedic Voice: A Week in Partnership with the National Comedy Center

  • The art of comedy is deeply personal, requiring artists and creators to tap into their own experience to hone a unique, resonant and authentic voice.
  • In this week, we examine how comedians working in an array of genres, media and styles have found their voices, developed their voices and mobilized their voices to communicate with audiences in impactful — and entertaining — ways.

Week Six :: July 31–August 7, 2021

Building a Culture of Empathy

  • Creating understanding and compassion, empathy is critical in navigating our world and building community. Empathy might have a reputation associated with emotionality or sentimentality, but what does it look like in action, from improving health care via the doctor-patient relationship and fostering strong childhood development to implementing effective public policy and leading through times of crisis?
  • Instilling and normalizing empathy has the potential to help us connect across our most polarizing differences and survive our most tragic times, so how can we work together to build a lasting culture of empathy?

Week Seven ::August 7–14, 2021

The State of the Economy: Where Do We Go From Here?

  • What drives the rebuilding of the economy in the wake of COVID-19? In the summer of 2021 — a year and a half after the pandemic plunged the U.S. into recession — we examine the state of “recovery” from Main Street to Wall Street; what has been lost and what has thrived; and what the crisis has laid bare in terms of necessary investments and structural reforms. How do we make our economy more resilient?
  • During this week we consider what building a new economy can and should look like, beyond high employment and growing businesses. Do we want an economy that looks like the one we had on January 1, 2020, or one that is more just in the distribution of wealth? What will we have learned during the months following the re-opening of the economy, and what are we learning from the approaches of other nations? What — and who — have we deemed essential in this new and evolving economy?

Week Eight :: August 14–21, 2021

The Human Brain: Our Greatest Mystery

  • Neurophysiologist and Nobel Laureate David Hubel once asked, “Can the brain understand the brain? Can it understand the mind? Is it a giant computer … or something more?”
  • In this week, we explore the folds and recesses of this distinctly human mystery, bringing together neuroscientists and psychologists to chart a path through the enigma of our consciousness, through the impacts of trauma and stress on our health, through the gray matter and the white matter, neurons and synapses, the wiring that embodies our cognition, that sparks our selves.

Week Nine :: August 21–29, 2021

Resilience

  • What drives people to keep going when forces outside their control work against them? And what does that tell us about our humanity and hope for the future? We close our 2021 season looking at the resilience that emerged during a tumultuous 2020. From a global pandemic to the quest for racial equality, we reflect on a revealing, historic period by lifting up the stories and the lessons of those who refused to give up, give in or go away.
  • Week Nine also welcomes the return of the Chautauqua Food Festival.

Chautauqua provides a wide variety of services of worship and programs that express the Institution's Christian heritage as well as its interfaith commitment. The Institution, originally the Chautauqua Lake Sunday School Assembly, was founded as an educational experiment in out-of-school, vacation learning for Sunday School teachers.

While founders Lewis Miller and John Heyl Vincent were Methodists, other Protestant denominations participated from the first year onward, and today Chautauqua continues to be ecumenical — as well as interfaith — in spirit and practice.

 

Morning Worship

072819 Susan Sparks MorningWorship MS 03The chaplains represent intended theological, denominational, gender, racial and ethnic diversity, as well as ministerial context. As always, the Department of Religion’s commitment to diversity in gender, race and theological perspective is clear. The philosophy of the Department of Religion, from the beginning, has embraced and manifested the belief that an expression of these diversities is key to Chautauqua’s future.

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Interfaith Lectures

072919 InterfaithAmigosAfternoon AW 03This series is designed to present issues that impact the lived experience of everyday life from theological, ethical, moral, humanitarian, philosophical and religious perspectives.

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Symphony Orchestra

081719 CS0 MS 05The CSO is a professional orchestra that draws its membership from around the nation and around the world.

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Theater

072519 OneManTwoGuvnors MS 17Internationally known actors, directors, designers and writers join 19 emerging artists drawn from top training programs to produce a vibrant body of work in the historic Bratton Theater.

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Opera

062619 Figaro90210 MS 04Chautauqua Opera is the oldest continuously producing summer opera company in the U.S. as well as the fourth-oldest American opera company overall.

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Chamber Music

081919 JLCOChamberMusic SY 05Instrumental and vocal music from medieval chant to Brahms to jazz to the contemporary music of our time.

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Visual Arts

081519 FloraFauna Review DM 01The Chautauqua Visual Arts (CVA) includes the School of Art, the galleries of the Strohl Art Center, the Fowler-Kellogg Art Center, the Melvin Johnson Sculpture Garden and the visual arts lecture series.

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Dance

072919 AlumniDanceGala SY 11Chautauqua showcases visiting dance companies each season, with wide-ranging styles from masterpieces in classical ballet to modern dance and contemporary ballet.

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Chautauqua Lecture Series (Morning Lectures)

08082019 LectureSereneJones VG 01Ideas and opinions are exchanged in an open, challenging atmosphere, and Chautauqua's knowledgeable audiences have the opportunity to participate in question-and-answer sessions at the conclusion of the lectures.

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Interfaith Lectures

07182019 AfternoonRohrSecondLife VG 03This series is designed to present issues that impact the lived experience of everyday life from theological, ethical, moral, humanitarian, philosophical and religious perspectives.

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Heritage Lectures

heritage lecturePresented by the Chautauqua Institution Archives, this series combines the research of Archives staff with notable historians and Chautauqua scholars in order to explore the rich history of the Institution and its effect on American culture.

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CLSC Authors

080119 CLSC Oyinkan Braithwaite MS 02Reading together since 1878, the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle has remained a leader in adult education through quality programming. Each summer, the CLSC chooses nine books of literary quality and invites the authors to Chautauqua present their work to an audience of approximately 1,000 readers.

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Special Lectures

071719 StaceyAbrams AW 06Lectures sponsored by the Institution but which fall outside the normal platform schedule will be posted as they are scheduled.

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Arts & Entertainment

081719 CS0 MS 05Chautauqua as a community celebrates, encourages and studies the arts and treats them as integral to all of learning. With symphony, opera, theater, dance, visual arts and a renowned music school, Chautauqua produces an "ecstatic mix" of programming that can be found nowhere else.

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Lectures

072919 InterfaithAmigosAfternoon AW 09The morning and interfaith lecture platforms are the bedrock of Chautauqua's programming. Many other lecture series also exist and support Chautauqua's weekly themes.

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Literary Arts

0725 JanusPrize BCH 2The literary arts are represented at Chautauqua by a variety of programs, from the CLSC to the Writers’ Center, and include two major national literary prizes.

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Faith and Religion Programs

072819 Susan Sparks MorningWorship MS 02Chautauqua provides a wide variety of services of worship and programs that express the Institution's Christian heritage as well as its interfaith commitment.

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Partnerships & Collaborations

JAZZ SeptetChautauqua is proud to partner and collaborate with other mission-based organizations to deliver programming that adds values and diversity to your CHQ Assembly experience.

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Subcategories

School of Dance
dance thumb

The Chautauqua Ballet program, under the direction of Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux, is well known for the unique opportunity it affords students to study with master teachers within a small studio environment.
>> Find out more

School of Art
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The School of Art presents the opportunity for the kind of sustained and focused study in studio art not available in academic settings.
>> Find out more

Theater
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Internationally known actors, directors, designers and writers join nineteen emerging artists drawn from the nation’s top training programs to form a unique company that produces a vibrant summer of work in the historic Bratton Theater.
>> Find out more

Instrumental
instrumental thumb

Each summer we enroll 80 of the most promising young instrumentalists from here and abroad to join us for an exciting summer of music making.
>> Find out more

Piano
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The program offers an exceptional and exciting mixture of traditional and innovative classes, concerts and an artist certificate program.
>> Find out more

Voice
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The Chautauqua Institution Voice Department is a seven-week intensive educational program that seeks to offer the highest caliber of training for the young singer, 18 and older.
>> Find out more

Schools Alumni
Alumni

Our arts alumni are currently living, performing, and teaching all over the world. We look forward to learning more about you and where you are headed in your life and career.
>> Find out more

Special Studies
specialstudies thumb

Special Studies offers subjects ranging from child and youth development, music, education, religion and philosophy, to fitness, health, and personal and professional development.
>> Find out more



 

The literary arts are represented at Chautauqua by a variety of programs.

The Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle presents weekly roundtable lectures by distinguished, nationally known authors; book reviews and discussion sessions programmed by the CLSC and the CLSC Alumni Association; and a Young Readers program.

The Chautauqua Writers’ Center coordinates workshops, free weekly readings, lectures by its writers-in-residence, a yearly pre-season Writers’ Festival, and the Chautauqua literary journal. Books featured in these programs, in addition to books by the Writers’ Center faculty, are always available at Chautauqua’s Smith Memorial Library, and the Chautauqua Bookstore.

Special literary events are featured in the Amphitheater and other Chautauqua locations throughout the season.

 

CLSC

Reading together since 1878, the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle has remained a leader in adult education through quality programming.

Each summer, the CLSC chooses nine books of literary quality and invites the authors to Chautauqua present their work to an audience of approximately 1,000 readers.

> Read more…

CLSC

clsc logo

Reading together since 1878, the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle has remained a leader in adult education through quality programming.

Each summer, the CLSC chooses nine books of literary quality and invites the authors to Chautauqua present their work to an audience of approximately 1,000 readers.

- See more at: http://www.chq.org/literary-arts/clsc#sthash.fCDv4T76.dpuf

Chautauqua’s programs for youth present a diversity of activity, in settings varied and historic. From pre-school to day camp, from sports instruction to informal youth centers, from enrichment classes to entertainment, and from reading to experiences in the arts, these programs offer opportunities to explore the Chautauqua experience. At the same time, youth are encouraged to grow in independence, make choices, take responsibility and celebrate family time, all in the safe and supportive community that is Chautauqua.

Chautauqua provides a wide variety of services of worship and programs that express the Institution's Christian heritage as well as its interfaith commitment. The Institution, originally the Chautauqua Lake Sunday School Assembly, was founded as an educational experiment in out-of-school, vacation learning for Sunday School teachers. While founders Lewis Miller and John Heyl Vincent were Methodists, other Protestant denominations participated from the first year onward, and today Chautauqua continues to be ecumenical — as well as interfaith — in spirit and practice.

October 27, 2015
The Department of Religion is co-sponsoring with Nazareth College a "Mini-Chautauqua in Rochester" program from 1:30 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 27, at the Otto Shults Community Center Forum on the Nazareth campus. The program is titled "On a Planet in Peril and Our Moral Responsibility." Click here for more details, a list of presenters and how to participate.